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Posts from the ‘Chobe National Park’ Category

Tis the Season in Botswana: Chobe National Park

The onset of rainy season fires up wild animals. Mare and I board a boat with eight others for a safari cruise on the Chobe River, where Botswana be on the left, Namibia on the right.

Photo by Marilynn Windust

Cruising the Chobe River in Botswana

The Chobe and Zambezi rivers meet at the tip of Impalila Island, resulting in a junction of four different counties – Botswana, Zambia, Namibia, and Zimbabwe.

Photo by Marilynn Windust

We know they are out there….

From the safety of our boat, we glide past crocodiles and lizards who blend in with the terrain. A bay of water lilies in bloom provides food and disguise for the many water birds. It also signals the beginning of breeding season.

Photo by Marilynn Windust

Can you see the bird?

None will escape the eye of the Fish Eagle, the national bird of Zambia, who scopes out the river scene from a tree.

Photo by Marilynn Windust

Fish Eagle, the national bird of Zambia

Hippos roll all over each other, engaging in foreplay. Males are full of testosterone and very aggressive.

Photo by Marilynn Windust

Hippos feeling frisky

They are Africa’s deadliest killers, from a mammal perspective, and have been known to charge boats. Running under water at amazing speed, they can sink their tusks through the hull of a boat! Experienced guides know how to spot the bow wave, and scoot on out of there.

Photo by Marilynn Windust

Hello there!

Here come the elephants. Chobe National Park boasts Africa’s largest elephant herds.

Photo by Marilynnn Windust

Here they come

They put on a spectacular show, frolicking in the muddy waters. Female elephants are careful to prevent randy young males from engaging in incest.

Photo by Marilynn Windust

Mama keeping an eye on the youngsters

When males reach this age, they are banned from the female herd. They get to hang out with the guys for the rest of their life, following the females in anticipation of an invite.

Photo by Marilynn Windust

Trouble brewing?

Once we disembark, and jump into a safari truck, the breeding theme intensifies.

Photo by Marilynn Windust

Waiting for dinner

Vultures wait for the remains of a kill, while we watch a male baboon get excited when a female strolls past. He licks his lips enthusiastically, but she keeps on walking. (That technique had never worked for me either)

Photo by Marilynn Windust

Hey there baby!

Whoa, big fella! This male elephant crosses our path in an obvious, perhaps desperate search for a female. Just how many legs do elephants have?

Photo by Marilynnn Windust

The elephant in the room

After a sexually charged water and land safari, we’re moving pretty slow back at the junction. I feel like smoking a cigarette.        Ron Mitchell

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